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since 1976. >> host: but as an example of fair use today? >> guest: . system are students everywhere, when they quote a scholar or encyclopedia of wikipedia or any other source in their paper. they get to use those words as a result of. journalists do every day when they see the report said this, quote, they're able to the materials. >> host: because the source? >> guest: now, although it is always a polite thing to do to give credit to people, but many examples where you would -- you never need to give credit to be within the copyright law. you would make people upset if he did it frequently. but any kind of collage artist makes, for instance, uses materials from different places and doesn't necessarily cite it. documentarians use copyrighted material inevitably all the way through their work because the world we live in is largely copyrighted due to the fact that in 1986. jamaican anesthetists interview? they are copyrighted for 70 years after your test. >> host: why? >> guest: copyright terms had been extended dramatically. fair use is so important these days, precisely because th
to discuss her most recent book reclaiming fair use a primer on properly using copper repeat copyright material in the world everything is copyrighted. this is a little over 15 minutes. >> patricia aufderheide as the author of reclaiming ferret used to put balance back in a copyright. university chicago press. professor aufderheide, what is fair use? >> the right to use other people's material without permission under some circumstances. >> host: where did that term come from? >> guest: it's part of law and it's been a part of the common law since 1841. and as a copyright act since 1976. >> host: what's an example of fair use today? >> guest: it is done by students everywhere when they quote a scholar or an encyclopedia or her wikipedia or any other source. they get to use it as a result of fair use. journalists do it everyday when they say the think-tank report said this no, actually sourcing doesn't have anything to you do it fair use although it is a polite thing to do to give credit to people, but many examples you never need to give credit to be within the copyright law. you would
demographics and birthrates could cause the u.s. to lose its place as a world leader sunday night at 9 eastern on "after words" on c-span2. and look for more online. like us on facebook. >> next on booktv, paul dickson presents a collection of words popularized by american presidents including warren g. harding's founding fathers invoked during his presidential campaign, theodore roosevelt's use of the word muckraker in a speech critical of specific journalists, and military industrial complex delivered by president eisenhower during his final presidential address to the american public in 1961. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much. i've been playing around with words for a long time, and i think when i was a kid, one of my -- i wasn't that athletic, and i wasn't that, you know, smart in various ways, but i could always go home and memorize a couple words, so i would learn words like apathetic and things like that. you know, for a third grader, it was a lot of fun. and as i got to be an older person, i got really fascinated by doing some tricks with words. one of m
that it doesn't do anything the u.s. doesn't like or one which apparently on the surface has more love for it. at the same time it's disengaged. it's not fair for ambassador rice. her engagement is where it should be. she's living day and night in the accident occurty council that's where she should be. i think that those probably warfare criticism during the first two to three years of the first barack obama term. >> host: when has the u.s. sought u.n. legitimacy? >> guest: most of the time as a per let to actions that it was planning on taking anyway. so in iraq, we saw legitimacy for something the entire world knew we were going do no matter what. i would say that the u.s. seeks a less contentious program which is -- [inaudible] peace keeping operations in places in the world where we can't operate others and put our people at risk. and yet, both for reasons of our interest and values and ideals. we think it would be a good idea if somebody on the ground to maintain amenable oil. i think we see u.s. legitimacy for purpose where our -- >> host: and you write in the book living with the u.n.
prohibiting the use of coffee and coca-cola -- cola in the world. this is a little over an hour as they discuss the invitation of its use worldwide. >> could please turn on that. thank you. we are going to be talking about coffee, and cola and the ingredients in cola. his latest book examines a series of highly addictive substances that have caused many deaths through much profit and how they make their way into the united states and what the u.s. government's role has been in ensuring that they come into this country. this evening, we are pleased to be joined by two drug policy experts as well. without further ado, i would like to hand it over to the panel. [applause] >> thank you so much for coming out here. i am so excited. it is great to be here in new york. i'm going to start off by talking about my book, and then we will go into what focuses this week and what is going on with the u.n. that basically prohibits this around the world. back in 2004 and 2005, i did a book about marijuana. it wasn't about how to smoke weed, but an educational book about how they might talk to t
the mississippi where they used to drive the logs in the old lumbering days, and the trails where the pioneers came north. saw some good bass jumping in the river. i never knew anything about the upper mississippi before, and it is really a very beautiful country and there are plenty of dozens and ducks in the fall. but not as many as in idaho and i hope we will both be back there shortly and can joke about our hospital experiences together. best always to you, old timer, from your good friend who misses you very much, mr. papa. ps, best to all the family. am feeling fine and very cheerful about things in general, and hope to see you all soon. papa. no one knows for sure, but these seem to be the last real senses ernest hemingway sat down on paper. amid so much ruin, still the beauty. thank you very much. [applause] >> we'd like to hear from you. tweet us your feedback. twitter.com/booktv. >> author jared diamond is next on booktv. he talks about what we can learn from traditional societies that exist in only a very few places around the world today but he also reflects on which people lived f
postevent features. and to get us started i want to reduce the mastermind of today's event, bernard curtis. burnet is, i learned today, one of four curators of photography in the prints and photographs division. i'm sure they are all here. it is my pleasure to turn it over to berna curtis. let's give her a and. -- in a hand. [applause] >> thank you very much, john. i have to say that we are all in this together. i'm not the mastermind. today, we have brigitte freed was the winner of the photographer whose work is featured in the book, "this is the day: the march on washington," which we are celebrating. and we have the distinguished dr. michael eric dyson, and we have paul farber. all of them here with us for a special kind of conversation, which is how we build this. i will tell you a little bit about each individual quickly. because time is of the essence. and i'd like to tell you that brigitte freed was formally brigitte pflueger, and she met leonard freed in rome in 1956. they married a year later in amsterdam where they lived, deciding to leave for life in the united states in 1963,
neglect them. we've got 15 members and they are rotating in us at the other things that the u.n., these rotations that generally speaking, not contentious because they rotate on a fixed and geographic basis. they are sort of an order, so there's not as much fighting as you might think maybe over membership. it is important to understand we do require a vote not just of the p5, but you've got to get a supermajority of the 15 members of the apartment to agree for security council action to go forward. so it's not just a case to block anything, but they don't have the ability to make anything they like happened. the u.n. is quite possibly the most recognized and makes the department of defense leclair by comparison. >> host: what is the effect of ms.? what is the general assembly and is a defective? >> guest: the general assembly of the meeting place above the nations. everybody has one vote. everybody has the police. you see this every year when the world leaders line up at the opening of the u.n. years, in september they each make their speech. the good part of it is the place
center for mathematical progress. and we are delighted to have david goldhill join us this afternoon to talk about his new book catastrophic care how american healthcare killed my father and how to fix it. what i think of to challenges of blind spots that conservatives have had on health care the first is that it tends to be liberals who criticize and critique our health care system largely because of the large on injured population and the reflexive intuitive response of conservatives have been to say the health care system is just fine. it's the best health care system in the world would. don't mess with it, don't change it. the second blind spot in general and in health care is that we tend to talk about policy, public policy philosophically or with the charts and data and charts and the data are important. but a lot of times with the way the liberals have one argument is by talking about the single mother in oregon who doesn't have health insurance and what we need to do to help her or the child that is born with cystic fibrosis and how the child can't get health insurance. these
to go visit. [laughter] >> by the way, when september 11 came, all of us, i think not just in new york but the entire world were riveted to the news, and one of the journalist was interviewing a woman from the midwest who said to the reporter, you know, i've been watching the events in new york, and those people are just like us. [laughter] >> i bet some of you have said that about new yorkers. [laughter] >> that moment made me realize many things. one, that all the unhappiness of september 11, september 11, there was one sliver of sunshine, and it was in the way that americans came together. and it didn't matter what background we had or where we were from. we stood together as a nation. that was really important lesson, but it also has made me realize when i was writing this book i wanted people to see the slice of my life that was different than theirs. now, i doubt the my experience as a reporter region in new york is identical to the experience of mexicans in texas, or identical to the experience of other immigrant groups in different parts of the united states or the world. but w
better not slimed us. they had released the chemicals down to battalion levels, we knew that. anybody over there who we were threatening could have retaliated with chemical weapons. so it was, again, there's so many levels. you listen to this, listen, for all you cadets better here, thank you for coming. because the levels of interacting here today has been just unbelievable. you've got what the president was thinking about, what he was doing, all these different levels, and then i was just out there, you know, at the end, you know, point, you know, tell me what to do, boss. >> i will jump in as the boss. [laughter] and i say thank you very much to dr. engel. [applause] general house. [applause] >> i happened to be on the trip that you saw highlighted in this video with the president and mrs. bush went to saudi arabia to see the troops before the ground war started. and the white house staff was trained to use gas masks and put on clothing. so we were very concerned about the use of chemicals and very bad things. with that, you are about to have some very good things. if you would ple
of people still in the world who do not have those benefits but for those of us that are lucky right now we are within ten years or 20 years of our ancestors so now the question is can you face aging head on and do something about the deterioration 50's, 60's, 70's and on up, can you do anything about that that would give us another to come 20, 30, 40 years or more. and my story's main character likes to argue if we can extend a little faster than we are doing now faster than the deterioration and essentially fervor. >> turn-of-the-century but when that money at or the 19th and that the 20th century what was life expectancy, about 40 years? >> in the 20th century it think it was 47, 48 years average life now we are out to about 80 years so an enormous gains in the last century. estimate how we get to a thousand? [laughter] >> well i have to say before we talk about how to get to a thousand years that there are two questions. there is can we and should we. can we -- we really want to and i think both of those questions are complicated. there is the philosophical side, the bio ethical questio
attempts to prohibit the use of coffee and coca in the u.s. and around the world. mr. cortes describes secret deals made by top u.s. anti-drug official harry answer linger pushing to banco ca's use worldwide. this is a little over an hour. >> okay. um, and so tonight we are pleased to welcome ricardo cortes to discuss his latest book, "a secret history of coffee, coe that and cola: a tale of coffee, coca-cola, caffeine, secret formulas, special flavors, special favors and a future of prohibition." cortes is the creator and illustrator of a series of subversive books for all ages, for postally all ages about such things as marijuana, bombing and the jamaican bobsled team. his latest book examines a series of highly addictive substances that have caused many deaths and fueled much, much profit in this how they make their way into the u.s. and what the u.s. government's role has been in insuring that they come into this country, all right? and this evening we are pleased to be joined by two drug policy experts as well. its fellow sanho tree and colette that youngers. and without further a
think use it will find the subject fascinating. [laughter] i'm going to talk about growing older in traditional societies. this subject is just one chapter of my "latest book which compares traditional small societies with our big bottom society with respect to many aspects of society, such as growing old, bringing up children, health, danger, a settlement disputes, war, religion, and speaking more than one language. this book is my most personal book, my book of, i think, the most practical value to our daily lives, and, as a shameless author, i hope it is going to be my best-selling book. [laughter] it is about one i have learned from spending a lot of my time in traditional tribal societies in new guinea of the last 60 years, and it is about what friends and others have learned from other trouble societies around the world. the essence of living in big, industrial societies and permanent housing with central governments to make decisions with writing and books and the internet. most people live past age 60, where we regularly encounter strangers, just as i am encountering you
to bases u.s. attacking their own personal try for their government? >> guest: you raised the third factor, with united states, the tribes now of the central government with a triangle of conflict that is the conflict said is often overlooked. would you include the central government than you know, it has its own relationship for some benefit and it is troubled earth these jurors south africa and asia you find this. if it is tolerant and open to give citizens the right they deserve to freedom or education but if it surprised -- suppresses but you have problems where you see the of brutalization and gadaffi with the triumphs saw the pattern exist and we looked at 40 case studies it is a global study of what is going on in the world. >> host: take pakistan and walked us through the different tribes. >> it is the essential piece of the study because waziristan is one of the most targeted places on earth. one of them most high and the tribal places an onerous never completely conquered it is part of pakistan but they maintain their own dependence with pride and tradition. the ordinary tribes
on book tv computer andres talks about a long history of smuggling in the u.s., which prior to the revolutionary war was driven by a desire to grow domestic industries and bypass paying import taxes to the british. it is about an hour and a half. >> good afternoon and welcome to the watson institute for international studies. the discussion of peter and raises new book, smuggler nation, hal illicit trade made america. housekeeping, i have to mention some things. the way we're going to run this is as follows. i will do a brief and perfunctory introduction. and peter is going to get up and talk briefly about the book is obviously most of you have not read the book. this will become a stanley one-way conversation. after this will invite richard and james to say their piece on the book, and hopefully we can get stuck into a good discussion of smuggler nation and its aspects. at that point, we will open it up for q&a. you will see it is one fix microphone, and another mobile microphone for this side of the house. if you wish to join the q&a, please, if you're on this side get up
that separates us we feel your support freedom for feminist and self expression and a big exclamation point as all around the. >> working on this book has been interesting from brooklyn to moscow the conversations about pussy riot the same topic comes up. so many say i of for somebody's speaking against oppression or fundamentalism but was this superbly it making a performance is in a church? what i have realized over time is yes this is the way social change happens never about power and justice because of a higher consciousness is about people being willing to act out, be inappropriate when they're not supposed to and it is important to buy the book and support policy rise in material ways to understand their message more deeply then how each of us stand up as often as possible. tonight joining me is some of my favorite artists and writers who are famously inappropriate and speak out of turn and i am so grateful to them to be a part of this project and book. i want them to come up and joining me here to start our program. [applause] we're going to do a brief enactment of the court room be
, center for medical progress. and we are delighted to have david gold hill join us this afternoon. for a talk about his new book, "catastrophic care: how american health care killed my father - and how we can fix it." i think that there's two, when i think about health care i think of to challenges of blind spots that i think conservatives have on health care. the first is that it tends to be liberals who criticize the critique our health care system, largely because of the large uninsured population. and the response is to say the health care system is just fine, it's the best health care system in the world, don't mess with it, don't change it. i think the second blind spot as conservatives in general but certainly in health care is that we tend to talk about policy, public policy philosophically, or with charts and data. charts and data are important. but a lot of times the we liberals have one argument is by talking about a single mother in oregon who doesn't have health insurance and what we need to do to help her, or the child who was born with cystic fibrosis, and how that
, william smith, and patricia brady. please let us know about the book fair and post them to our wall at booktv or e-mail us at booktv@c-span.org. author jared diamond talks about his book and the way people live in human existence. what we can learn from traditional societies. >> i would like to invite doctor diamond to the stage. please give him a warm welcome to the seminar. [cheers] [applause] >> let me first check if you can see be okay. can you hear me in the back? it is a great pleasure to be back in philadelphia today and back and this wonderful library to talk about a subject other than gall bladders. [laughter] >> to give me an idea how many may find what i'm about to tell you a practical value. please reason into one of the other of two questions are lasker the first is, could you raise your hand if you are over age 65 years old or hope to live past age 65? or have a parent or grandparent over 65 years old red many of you, all right. the second group, please raise your hand if you are under 65 and have no intention living past 65 and do not have a parent or grandparent pass
. >> host: so ambassador ahmed, do locals in afghanistan, different tribes, see the u.s. as attacking their personal tribe or see their own afghanistan government? >> guest: peter, you have now raised a very important question. you raised the third actor. so you have the united states, you have the tribes, and you now rates the idea of the central government as a third person. you have a triangle and that is the complexity that is often overlooked. the central government has its open relationship with its own periphery, and very often it's a troubled one. go to the middle east, not africa, central asia, and you'll find this pattern. if the central government is tolerant and open and inclusive and gives it citizens the rights they deserve, to freedom to education, health, job opportunities, there's no problem. if it suppresses and suppresses and prewitt brailizes its own population you have problem. whether it's iraq and saddam hussein or sirral and brutalization of the people you. see the same pat turn. gadhafi, the eastern tribes, the benghazi people. so the pattern exists throughout
of the task" with co-author mark bowden. former commander of u.s. forces recounts the major turning point in his thirty-four year military career which ended in 2010. this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much, thanks for coming out. wonderful opportunity, the gentleman sitting next to me is kind of a big deal. for anyone who is -- pays attention to american foreign policy and military affairs you know that ever since the attacks on this country on 9/11 the united states has had to evolve militarily and in the intelligence community to meet the challenge of this new enemy and more than anyone i can think of, general mcchrystal has been responsible for shaping the evolution and developing what i call the targeting engine which is what we adopted as the primary method of defending the country. thank you for being here, great to see you. >> thanks for two kind introduction. i thought of you as a nonfiction writer but you have gone into fiction now. >> you were the commander of special operations in iraq and afghanistan and there have been a rapid evolution. i am familiar from w
and around tax time i get very upset when i'm being questioned in a very inhumane way. so if i use many drivers license, i'm okay. when i pop a sierra leone passport, all of a sudden big problem. i'm the same guy, same people at the same area. it's almost like there's no human interaction at all. and if you try valid information from people for security reasons, you can actually get more than if you're inhumane to them. so it's always quite fascinating to see what the reaction is. every time i enter, i came back from geneva that every time i come back ims questions, but i find the questions incredibly funny. one of them was that i just arrived in the guy asked me, so where were you? is a geneva. he said how long? at the two, days. why reengineered a short time? i only had a few days to do my work. why? i don't know, this is how it was. while you're traveling with a small but? because i was gone for two, three days. but through my backpack and when you travel so many places? because of my work. eventually i say is that there were 10 years, it was like where? would be done in the question
people really do talk about -- they use that kind of exercise language that i use in the book, you know, you need mental calisthenics as well as physical ones to kind of keep your mind healthy, and that apparently can be helpful in dealing with alzheimer's and things like that, so there may well be a prescription of video games we may want to dole out to senior citizens. ok. good. all right. >> called everything bad is good for you, agree, disagree, the book is there for you to read and debate. and we ..ncoming out. [applause] >> are you going to stay around? >> stick around, we are going to sign. >> is that where i >> next on the tv, trevor aaronson says since 9/11 the fbi has built up a network of over 15,000 informant and muslim communities around the u.s. he argues these informants spearhead phony terror plots which are then exposed by the fbi with great fanfare to make it look like the was doing a good job of keeping us safe. mr. aaronson is joined by coadjutor mother jones magazine. this is in our 15. [applause] >> thank you so much for coming out. trevor and i spend a lot of time
the guinness world record for most secret decoder rings used in one place. that is the nerdiest thing you can do with your time ever. we had john from day -- daily show helped us. and nothing is better except being in a book store on a friday night. so i pity all of us, really, all of us. i want to say the most important thing of all, it will be the most important thing i'll say all night, and thank you. everything i say after that will be straight downtown hill, and some of the specific thank yous to the end. we're here too talk about "fifth assassin." and people ask me where the book came from. no one gets crazeyear e-mail than me. no one gets more proof that abraham lincoln is gay than me. the last time i was at this store for the inner circle, someone brought me the holy grail, okay? is that guy here? is the -- i have to ask first. not here? then let's talk about him. here's what happens. i'm not dish promise you this is true. i was standing right of the and he comes top me early and says, brad, you want to see he holy grail? and he ah has crazy eyes and i'm like, you brought the holy gra
is moving in in strange ways. it used to be said that books were written for the general reader. now they're written by the general reader. .. eager to join in dialogue about where we as a nation find ourselves in this drive towards freedom and it seems particularly fitting that we would have this conversation today, the day after the nation paused its daily business to pay tribute to reverend martin luther king, jr.'s life and legacy. and it seems fitting that we would have this conversation the day after the nation's first black president was sworn in for his second term. i know much of the nation has already moved on, and president obama's rhetoric about the promise of america, life, liberty, justice, equality for all has already been forgotten by many, and i know that many people in america will not think of dr. king again until his holiday rolls around again next year. but i would like to us to pause to night and think more deeply about the meaning of dr. king's life and his legacy and what it has to teach the nation's present. it seems important to do that given that this year marks
and historian michael beschloss. .. and a now, it starts and moves forward and cuts us off from any access to african history, which was not what woodson in tended. and so, we obviously owe the peopleof our higher to and so we obviously of the who d those who are descended from those people who worked for 246 years for nothing. we owed them something for that, but we owe them the story of themselves. we have been asked to expect that people can survive in good, sound psychological health, on ashes and obliterated history. when i was a child in richmond, virginia, weiss to have this phrase that we used all the time. from here to timbuktu. but, nobody knew what timbucktoo was. nobody knew the meaning of the word. didn't know where it was and didn't even know it was a place. timbucktoo of course was a crossroads of commerce but it was also a site the site of one of the world's first universities of san kora which was built before the blackmore's ilk the first university in spain at sala make a and 7-eleven a.d.. and so still in timbuktu you have all of these manuscripts written between five a
just single, contact to us. thank you very much. [applause] >> in the early-morning hours of august at akkad, following negotiations and promises iraq's dictator, saddam hussein not to use force, a powerful iraqi army invaded it stressed and much weaker neighbor, kuwait. within three days, 120,000 iraqi troops with 850 tanks have poured into kuwait and moved south to threaten saudi arabia. >> in my direction, elements of the 82nd airborne division as well as key units are juicy keen of no one friend or fellow and no one should underestimate our determination to confront aggression. >> our objectives in the persian gulf are clear. our goal is to find and familiar. iraq must withdraw from kuwait completely, immediately and without conditions. [applause] these goals are not ours alone. they've been endorsed by the united nations security council five times in as many weeks. most countries share our concern for principal and many have a state in the stability of the persian gulf. this is not a saddam hussein would have it, the united states against iraq. it is iraq against the world. >>
in and impose the strategy he wants to with the full agreement of the u.s. government. this has all been very exquisitely coordinated. >> now jonathancast, katz, who lived in haiti, talks about the work to rebuild the country. it's 45 minutes. >> hello. thank you for the introduction. this is very cool. this is my first book, so if i look like i'm really not accustomed to this, it's because i'm really not accustomed to this. so the book is called "the big truck that went by." and there's a spoiler in the subtitle. how the world came to save haiti and left behind a disaster, i'm going to read to you a little bit about it and talk about it, and then i hope that we have a good discussion as this topic usually provokes. so i'm going to start by reading from chapter one, the end. before i do i'm going to give myself some water. this brand of water is in the book. had i known that i would have picked that section. i can try to look for it in a little bit. these are actually delivered to haiti after the earthquake by the u.s. military. it's called fiji water for a reason. it comes from fiji, which i
about operas, books, and publishing by letting us on facebook at facebook.com/booktv or folacin twitter. up next, samuel graveyard use of our elected leaders of find the courage to reform the economy and government spending soon the u.s. could find itself in the same terrible economic situation as many european countries to. this is just over an hour. [applause] >> thank you for your introduction. it's a great privilege to be here. inviting the it council, in many cases the of many people here and heritage for very long time. and also admired the way that heritage works across policy areas so that you really do here and integrated message. not least among which, i think, is the attention of the heritage foundation to the power of culture, by which i mean people of beliefs, ideas, habits, expectations, and the way that these achieve some form of institutional expression. >> on this issue of culture and how it relates to the economy, the heart of my book, becoming europe. because the -- becoming europe is certainly about what has happened to your and why it is now regarded as the sick man
in the notion of an enlightened citizenry. some of us think that some of us think democracy is defined by the ritual of voting. in voting voting is important in a democracy but voting takes place all over the world, takes place in democracies, takes place in dictatorships, takes place in totalitarian societies. voting alone does not mean that we live in a free society. we live in a free society when it is based on an enlightened citizenry that takes that enlightenment into action, causing those whom we would elect to honor our ideals as a nation. >> dr. activist and transafrica founder randall robinson taking your calls, e-mails, facebook comments and tweets, in depth, this sunday at noon eastern on booktv on c-span2. >> my cartoons depict native humor. at first when i first started this cartoon they were native characters in native situations and my audience was geared towards natives but in the last four or five years they have become more universal where they spilled out into the main theme or dominant culture so it is more universal now. i am inspired by the people that i grew up w
to see featured on booktv? send us an e-mail at booktv at c-span.org or tweet us at twitter.com/booktv. on c-span2, we bring you booktv. 48 hours of non-fiction authors and books. here are programs to look out for this weekend. at 5:00 p.m. eastern. ben argues that liberals bully their competition discouraging political debate. then at 2:00 a.m. michelle alexander crime policy from the '70s were enacted to push back gangs made during the civil rights movement. on sunday with recent policy debates on congress in immigration rebring you stories from immigrants who share their experiences on booktv. that's at 4:00 p.m. eastern. at 11:00 p.m. on sunday. melvin argues that the government is spending excessively on defense. making us less secure. watch these programs and more all weekend long on booktv. for a complete schedule, visit booktv.org. next on booktv, petered bergen and a panel of contributors discuss the book "talibanistan: negotiating the borders between terror, politics and religion" which expores the threat posed by extremist who operate in the border area between af
to move along to get to all the features and get us started what i want to introduce the mastermind of today's event, i've learned today one of four curators of photography and i am sure they're all here. it is my pleasure to turn the program over to verna curtis. [applause] >> thank you very much, we're all in this together. i am not the mastermind. we have brigitte freed the widow of the photographer of the book "this is the day" the march on washington" which we are celebrating. the also have michael eric dyson and paul farber here with us for a special kind of conversation. i will tell you about each individual quickly because time is of the essence and i would like to tell you brigitte freed said she met leonard freed 1956 in rome and lived and varied in amsterdam when they left for the united states in 1963 a few months before that would be the march on washington. i don't think they knew that was about to happen. she printed leonard's photographs over 20 years including those in the book black and white america and made in germany and the internationally acclaimed exhibitions
next year. but i would like for us to pause tonight and think more deeply about the meaning of dr. king's life and his legacy and what it has to teach us about our nation's president. it seems particularly important for us to do that given that this year marks the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. 50 years have passed since his voice soared over the washington monument, declaring his dream "i have a dream. it is a dream deeply rooted in the american dream." yesterday while i was watching president obama's inaugural address, i heard echoes of king's speech i have a dream. and when i turn off my television set, i spent a few minutes reflecting on the question are all of us truly welcome to share in this dream come the same dream that dr. king dreamed? most americans i am sure can be cite portions of dr. king's i have a dream speech by heart. it's an extraordinary and very familiar speech i've grown accustomed to hearing clips of his speech played over and over are cycled over and over on the radio every january. they are the favorite quotes, the favorite lines. and now that i h
from writing "black hawk down "with the way thing were in the early '90s. can you give us an idea of the overall strategy and we'll get to specifics, maybe but also the tactics you have developed? >> not me. a group of people did. thanks. take a you back a little bit. at end of the vietnam war as america has done at the end of other wars want special operations unit that are created specially get gutted or they get disbanded entirely. there's a bias to do away with them inspect in the late 1980s when i joined the special forces they were in pathetic shape. they were barely a shad low what they had been at the hay day of the vietnam war. in 1980, the mission was launched to try to conduct a rescue mission in teheran to rescue the american citizens held hostage in the embassy. it failed not only painfully, but it failed for many reasons but one of which is the special operations capability we had people who were brave and strong and whatnot. they were not an integrated community capable of doing complex things indeed. it was a complex endeavor. it failed. from the ashes there was a
are delighted to have david joining us this afternoon to talk about his new book catastrophic care how american healthcare killed my father and how to fix it. i think that there is -- when i think about health care i think of to challenges i think the conservatives have had on health care. the first is it tends to be little to criticize and critique the health care system because of the march and injured population and the response is than to say while the health care system is just fine. it's the best health care system the world. don't mess with it. don't change it. i think the second blind spot of conservatives in general the certainly in health care is the we tend to talk about policy, public policy philosophically or with charts and data and they are important, but a lot of times the way the liberals have one arguments is by talking about the single mother in oregon who doesn't have health insurance and what we need to do to help her or the child is born with cystic fibrosis and the child cannot get health insurance. these are real challenges in the system. there are other challenges for p
be clear. [laughter] [applause] . . we had john hodgman from "the daily show" who came out and helped us to it. being in a bookstore on a friday night people, okay so all of us really, all of us. i want to say the most important thing of all and it will be the most important thing i say tonight is thank you. everything i say after that we'll be will be straight downhill and i will tell you some of this is a big thank yous to the end. but we are here to talk about is the "the fifth assassin." people say what you where do you get your ideas for the book? i will tell you about this. nobody gets crazier e-mailed to me. the last time i was asked at the store for the inner circle someone brought me the holy grail. is that guy here? i have to ask first. he's not here? then let's talk about him because here's what happened. i promise you this is true. there was standing right of there and he comes up to me earlier and he is like red, do you want to see the holy grail? he had the crazy eyes going back and forth and i'm like you brought the holy grail all the way to barnes & noble how do i not say
shortly and best to use old timer for your friend who misses you very much, mr. poppa. ps best to all the family and feeling fine and things in general and hope to see you soon. poppa. . . thanks to all of you, too, for coming. >> i'm sorry. can you hear me now? it's nice to be here. a few years ago the atlantic monthly began our career in the washington that was bad enough. now i discovered the bar which also flourished our carrier along the way. last year i went to dinner but it wasn't the riffs ritz. they said you meant the taj. thank god of the boston public library. are the acoustics working now? >> we worked on eight books together. up to this point it is described we talked some more and the book that we looked for emerged. the scholar looking at the manuscript some isn't that we destroyed the evidence. there is no evidence. we haven't left a paper trail. the marks i made on the pages are useless and in any case i prefer the spoken word over the 40 years we learn about writing and editing nonfiction and we try to write them down with the collaboration of meaning this tim
, it used to be an army research facility. and what they used to do is if you were shot in the civil war and you died, and you got shot in the arm and you died, they would awe off your arm and send -- saw off your arm and send it to the research place and say figure out why you died. they couldn't figure it out. so they kept sawing off body parts parts and sent it off to this museum. they realized at germ therapy develops the reason you're dying is because of infections, blood poisoning. and when they figured that out, they now realize, they say, wait, we're going to turn this research facility into a museum. and he said to me that the smithsonian has dorothy's ruby red slippers, we got all the body parts. and that's a party, right? and they have, what happened was when lincoln was shot and they did the autopsy and they took his brain out, the bullet fell from his brain, clinked into the sink, and that's how they found it. when the assassins were killed, people love the assassins in an odd, creepy way. they were almost like saints, they wanted pieces of them. so they used to cut the lini
to most of us. bell about sharing one of your typical days at the court. >> when i say it most of you won't want the job. [laughter] you know, we have spent most of our base reading. we read briefs. we read amicus briefs which are by the court. we read the record that has been created below, the decisions of courts across the country who have faced the question. we then research and we right in we right and then we added. and almost every day we are reading research and writing. it does not sound very exciting. then our opinion gets published. all of that thinking gets shown to the world. and it is what people look at. they don't really realize how much we have to do to get their, and it is work to get there, hard work. and remembering that every decision we make their is a wonder and their is a loser. if they don't like what we have done the don't think we're smart. they think really is a. they think we are doing it based on policy. the somehow we just don't like what they like. it is so far from the truth. judging is a skill, a profession . you are trained to look at issues in a legal w
china, the u.s., now canada, even leaders doesn't permit us to monitor. doesn't permit us to report to international body. doesn't permit an international body to tell us what to do with emission. sovereignty has become the obstacle to cooperation and increasely made states look more and more dysfunctional. how is that the most powerful, well equipped military nation in the world has ever seen the united states of america can't bring a handful of terrorists to heal in benghazi or mali, or afghanistan. the asymmetry between a massive military based on big ships, planes, and bombs and the reality of every day -- cross borders that a symmetry means that the war machine, the war machine of the greatest state there ever was is largelier relevant to the security threats we face. as we learn on 9/11 when in this city, a handful of hijackers living in the united states for years hijacked our planes and turned them to weapons. they didn't have to be given weapons by anyone. they seize them and use them and created devastation here. that, again, is a sign of this new asymmetry. and you find i
assassin," including his examination of the four people who have successfully assassinated u.s. presidents. it's about 40 minutes. >> so a couple, let me count it, one, two, three, four, five -- fourteen days ago in new york city we broke the guinness world record. we were trying to break the guinness world record for most secret decoder rings used in one place. that is the nerdest thing you can do with your -- nerdiest thing you can do with your time ever. we broke the record, it was great. nothing was nerdier except being in a bookstore on a friday night, people, okay? [laughter] so just, i pity all of us really, all of us. um, i want to say the most important thing of all. it will be, i promise, the most important thing i will say tonight, and that is thank you. everything i say after that will be straight downhill, and i'll tell you, i'll save some of the specific thank yous for the end. what we're here to talk about is "the fifth assassin," and people always say where do you get your ideas for books? i'll tell you about this store. because of dakota, no one gets crazier mail than me.
are talking about the divisions that cause people to start thinking like enemies, still very much with us. [applause] >> i want to thank taylor branch for being with us tonight. he will be signing books in the library. i want to thank the livingston foundation for sponsoring this lecture and it anybody in california is listening please -- we could really use it. thank you very much. [applause] >> for more information visit the author's website taylor branch.com. >> to take booktv is in savannah, ga. for live coverage of the savannah book festival starting at 10:15 eastern with nobel prize winner and former vice president al gore on the future. 11:thirty-fourth and eighty psychologist heidi squire craft on rule number 2, lessons i've learned in a combat hospital. at 1:30 cnn's chief washington correspondent jake tamper on the war in afghanistan from the outpost. 2:45 presidential historian kevin thomas on ike's glove. at 4:00 pillage a prize-winning historian gerri willis asks why priests. the savannah book festival part of three days of booktv this president's day weekend on c-span2. >> n
and our friends across the country joining us on televisiotelevisio n. thank you for joining us. [applause] i am excited that mayor denise parker and -- are here with us tonight. [applause] denise parker is one of my heroes, one of my favorite people and a touristic mayor. please stand mayor and first lady cathy. [applause] you can see past presentations of the progressive forum on our web site, great minds such as jane goodall, richard leahy, bill moyers and supreme court justice john paul stevens. go to our web site at progressive form houston.org. that is progressive forum houston.org. we are pleased to give a book to every attendee tonight. just show your ticket in the distribution table in the grand foyer. additional books are also on sale in the grand foyer by the bookshop. after justice sotomayor's presentation presentations you would join me for a q&a. i should say a supreme court rules don't allow us to discuss court cases of the past, present or future but we will delve deeply into her fascinating story. justice sotomayor will sign books, and greet fans in the grand foyer. i crie
weinberg and we are at the lincoln bookshop and chicago. we have a few people here with us and we are happy to have c-span join us. thank you very much. the illinois channel has been here and liz taylor from the tribune literary book section is with us and we appreciate all of them being here and also voice of america is covering us today as well. before we go on i should tell you all that this is not for c-span we hope you will give our first name and we will shout out to you. and we'll try to get it on air as quickly as we can. if you're watching the archive, all we ask is that we have signed books and we will have some left over, first editions and certainly don't want to be with the screenplay of the lincoln movie after it gets to be an oscar-winner and you don't have assigned. so get it now while you can. if you're on c-span and would like to be a part of us, i hope that you will buy getting to virtual book signing.net and leaving her e-mail to be a part of this virtual book signing family. also i should let you know that next month we are not going to have an author and. instead we ar
quite cranky with us for saying it but how about that? you can't say anything about iraq. he never saw iraq. it happened 30 years after he was gone. >> now i would like to add with what you began the book with which is in this most recent election in iran that when there was considerable consternation about how the election went, the state aired the lord of the rings in an effort to pacify people but he didn't have that effect. what happened to? >> the tremendous irony is that while the state, the ahmadinejad regime says they don't get many western movies. these movies are hotter than the sun and everybody is watching them. of course years after they came out of the west, they came out in early 2000 it was 2009, here is the irony. the seikh pokes the movies out there that they should have had some of their own people watch them very carefully. what the movies do, when the movies are about ursula freedom they argue in favor of democracy and on as practices and fair treatment as in a combination of injustice, they would hardly be something you would show people to try to calm them down.
us at twitter.com/booktv. >> you're watching booktv. next, jeffrey engel talks about his book, "into the desert," a collection of essays by journalists, government officials, and scholars that look back on the events in the impact of the 1990-91 gulf war. it's about an hour 20 your. >> doctor jeffrey engel is the founding director of the presidential history project at southern methodist university, until the summer of 2012, he served as the class of 52 a.m., professor at texas a&m university in the bush school. so we are pleased there here as well. that you very much for the support you've given to jeffrey engel and to the bush school in texas and them. when jeff was in texas a&m county was the dreck of programming for the institute and is a graduate of cornell university. additionally, studied at saint catherine's college, oxford university, and received his ph.d in american history from university of wisconsin at madison. he served as an postdoctoral fellow in international security studies at yale university. his books include "cold war at 30,000 feet,." he received a pretty sign
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